Espresso Roast Coffee – The Grand Espresso Comparison

I’ve had this espresso roast coffee for a while.

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It’s pretty much what you’d expect from espresso roast: strong, bitter, with heavy burnt overtones.
But I have two espresso makers, and that’s what’s going to take up the majority of this post.
First, my espresso machine:

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And my Moka Pot:

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(From this point on, this will be the order in which I compare them and have pictures.)
Here are their filter/coffee holder things:
(Machine)

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(Moka Pot)

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Obviously, the holes in the Moka are a lot bigger, but, because of the design of it, that doesn’t actually make it that
it lets sediment through. You’ll see.
For the machine (it’s a Braun), you load it into the filter thing, put it in this thing:

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Put it in the machine, with enough water for two or four shots (depending how much coffee you put in, I made four), and turn it on.
Three or four minutes later, it pours into the container on the bottom, and it’s done.

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For the Moka Pot, things are a bit different.
You fill the filter with coffee, then fill this thing to the line with water:

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Put the filter in there, then screw this on top:

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Then you put that on the stove on low for about nine minutes.
It bubbles into the top section, and is done.

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Now for comparison. The espresso from the machine is arguably lighter, and easier to drink. There is some light acidity right after you drink it, but after that, it fades into the coffee flavour. It has a small amount of oil (from the coffee beans) on top. It doesn’t really have much sediment at the bottom.
The Moka Pot espresso is heavier. It has a larger amount of the oils on top, and is stronger in flavour. Bitterness is the first taste, then it fades into the coffee flavour with a lingering acidity.
It has a good amount of sediment at the bottom. Yes, I know I said the larger filter holes didn’t necessarily mean it would have more sediment. And it doesn’t. That’s because that’s not really what the filter is for, in this instance. It’s just to keep coffee grounds out of the water in the base section. There is a grate on the bottom of the top section, though, on that too, the holes are bigger than on the machine.

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This entry was published on January 28, 2015 at 5:52 pm. It’s filed under Brewing, Coffee, Drink, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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